Monday, July 18, 2011

 
Photo from July 2011, courtesy of Bev
Great close-up of the dedication plaque on the gate post.  Courtesy of Bev from July 2011


Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Historic Cemetery in Disrepair


Oh, the Irony!

How ironic. The photo above captures the motto inscribed on a small plaque embedded in the cement post of the Pioneer Cemetery in McDonough County, Illinois. Ironic because in May 2010, the cemetery was forested by a variety of large old trees and younger saplings, and a faulty fence has allowed this ground to be the abiding place of choice for a herd of colorful cows and a young, ornery bull.

"Erected in honor of the pioneers who cleared away the forests and destroyed the abiding places of the wild beasts so that civilization might occupy the ground." 
This cemetery is surrounded by privately-owned land with no direct access from the public road. An easement is granted to cross the owner’s field to gain access to the site which is "enclosed" by an unlocked, gated fence. There are more than 50 documented burials on this one acre tract.

Brief History of the Cemetery

I imagine my Great-great-great grandfather, Greenup McClure, must certainly have chosen the location for his family burial ground with care and thoughtful consideration for the future.  After all, the people he loved best are laid to rest in that spot. I imagine that the historically-minded folks who chose the motto for the old gate post would be speechless at the droll paradox that now exists.

The acre Greenup McClure and his wife, Mary “Polly” (McComsey) McClure, set aside for the cemetery in 1835, not long after their family moved to Illinois from Kentucky, was centrally located on their homestead in Section 22, Bethel Township, McDonough County, Illinois. But that central location upon the farm has proven to be troublesome in maintaining and preserving this historic cemetery. 

The first known burial in 1838 was that of Greenup McClure's baby grandson, George Brundage, son of his daughter Mary.  More than 50 additional burials occurred over the subsequent 100 years, the latest, that of Sarah Norris, having occurred in 1943. 

It is Very Hard to Find

The McClure homestead long ago passed out of the hands of Greenup McClure's descendents. Many of them moved away when the westward expansion popularized homesteading in Kansas and Missouri.  Others who remained in Western Illinois have all but forgotten this old cemetery which is camouflaged by nature and located "way out in the boonies" well off the beaten track.  Recently the historical society placed a very nice new sign at the gate of the cemetery.  (Unfortunately, the sign is barely visible from the nearby country road--no ones fault, it's just that the cemetery is obscured by large trees). 

A deep ravine provides a natural border to the western edge of the cemetery, while pastures and fields flank the three other sides.  One must trek across the surrounding farm owner's land to enter the cemetery.  On some occasions I've opened the gates and driven through the pasture to the cemetery (with permission and care not to disturb the grazing cows). 

In the early 1990's a distant cousin and dedicated family researcher, Dan Venard, first guided my family to the cemetery.  It was mid-summer and at that time a serious overgrowth of weeds, including poison ivy, and the thought of possibly encountering snakes in the brush while lacking boots, made it impossible to explore deeply within the enclosure.  We were able to observe our mutual Venard ancestor's heavy monolith in an upright state and in good repair.  Dan also provided me with an old photo of that stone he took when the cemetery was better maintained in the 1960's. 

After many years away from Illinois, I still recalled the general location of the cemetery and tried to show it to my visiting cousin from Arizona a few years ago.  We were frustrated when we couldn't find it, but we visited another old cemetery where others of our direct line were laid to rest instead.  Still, I had it in my mind to find the Pioneer Cemetery, but even with map in hand and location plotted--it was still very difficult.  It turned out my cousin and I had been within a few hundred yards as we traveled up and down that county road trying to find the place.  A neighboring farmer proved essential in pointing out the hidden acre to me on my subsequent visit. 

On that visit of three years ago, I found the cemetery in fair but deteriorating condition.  As I photographed my family stones, it became obvious that it was important to photograph any and every stone I could find since the place was so inaccessible to the general public. 

Family Connectons Could Help Save the Cemetery

When I later set about researching the photos I had taken that day, the family connections emerged.  Most of 50-plus individuals were somehow related to Greenup McClure.  His daughter's married surnames (Venard, Wilson and Thompson) dominate the cemetery.  Some of those interred here, however, were neighbors in this township (for example, the Fugate and Osborn families) and others belonged to the family of subsequent owners of the property (Montee).  (In a separate blog entry you'll find a relationship chart).

I'm making this blog to display the biographies of the individuals interred in this cemetery and share the photos that I have of the graves.  I'm also including excerpts of the poor quality video that shows the conditions of the cemetery as of May 2010.  The McDonough County historical society is aware of the current situation and we await their actions.  I have also placed a call to the current owner of the surrounding farmland.  However, so much damage has been done to the existing graves, I'm hoping we can encourage a broad range of interest in preserving and rehabilitating this historic cemetery.




Notes:  This cemetery is officially named the Pioneer Cemetery, but it has also been referred to as the McClure Cemetery, Montee Cemetery, and Cost Cemetery. 

I'd also like to point out that Gordana Rezab’s 2008 publication, “Place Names of McDonough County, Illinois: Past and Present,” seriously errs in reporting that the Pioneer Cemetery was vacated by the Freeman Coal Mine for strip mining purposes. Rezab incorrectly asserts that the remains in this cemetery were disinterred and buried in the Old Macomb Cemetery unless otherwise claimed by relatives. In fact, the author’s claims apply instead to the Gin Ridge (also called Irish or Gunning) Cemetery in Bethel Township which was, in fact, located on land purchased by the Freeman Company in Bethel County's Section 26. This event was well documented by Goldstein and Buikstra in their 2004 publication, “A Nineteenth Century Rural Irish Cemetery in McDonough County, Illinois” that appeared as Chapter 4 in the book, “An Upper Great Lakes Archaeological Odyssey.”



References:

  • Lester, D. (undated). Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry. 
  • Clarke, S.J. (1878). History of McDonough County, Illinois, Its Cities, Towns and Villages. Springfield, Ill., 1878
  • Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois. Retreived 3/21/2008 from www.macomb.com/mcgs/cemeteries/   
  • History of McDonough County, Illinois. (1885). Continental Historical Co., Springfield, Illinois Transcribed by Karl A. Petersen for McDonough County ILGenWeb. Retrieved 3/21/2008 from http://www.macomb.com/~ilmcdono/townships/Betheltpindex.html  
. ..

Monday, June 7, 2010

Updates on Preservation Efforts

July 13, 2010

Finally, I made it to the McDonough County Court House where the very helpful staff in the assessor's office and County Clerk's office were able to determine that since 2005, the cemetery has been a seperate and distinct entity belonging to Bethel Township.  At that time the current owners of the (former) Greenup McClure land deeded the cemetery over.  (In the assessor's office it is listed as 0.4 acre, but the County Clerk's records documents 1.9 acres.)  I hadn't even thought about a township layer of government.  So, they provided me with contact information and getting in contact with those folks is the next logical step. 

That's it for now!

Earlier updates below:

Hi, All,

I received an email from the McDonough County Historical Society today (June 30, 2010).  They politely let me know that this is not a project that they are going to pursue.  I respect them being direct about it.  I wish we would have known this sooner so we could have proceeded accordingly.  Very disappointingly, the folks there in Macomb also haven't checked on the cemetery to make sure that the cows are out of there. 

I'll decided to use this bit of blog space to update the status of  "what's going on" in trying to pursue some concrete preservation attempts. 

The land that the cemetery is located on does not belong to the farmer who owns the land surrounding it.  In the off chance that the MCHS might "know" who owns it--I did email them to ask, but I also decided to make a call to the McDonough County Clerk's office where a very helpful lady instructed me on our next steps.  I'll have to go up there next week and do some research with the County Assessor and the County Clerk's office to sift through the propery records for this land from the time that our ancestor purchased it in in 1830's.  From there, we can pursue the steps that the state of Illinois has legislated for rehabilitating abandoned cemeteries. 

Over the weekend I submitted a letter to the editor of the McDonough County Voice, and I'll include it here--who knows if it will be printed: 
Dear Editor:

It’s not often that I get a chance to stop in McDonough County. When I do, it’s usually related to some matter of historical interest. The Pioneer Cemetery west of Industry where over 50 early settlers are interred is of particular interest to me. Over Memorial Day weekend, I was alarmed to find that the fence surrounding this landlocked cemetery had been compromised by a heard of beautiful, yet destructive cows.

Already in poor condition in recent years with many gravestones lying flat, the cows have created more damage in the cemetery by knocking additional stones from their bases and crushing damaged stones underfoot. Several individuals with ancestors buried there have contacted the McDonough County Historical Society to urge repair of the faulty fence, but we have not been advised of any immediate plans to mitigate the damage. Perhaps there is another, more appropriate, agency which can intervene to preserve this early cemetery?

Many early homesteaders, at least one Civil War veteran, and an early McDonough County commissioner are among those laid to rest in the Pioneer Cemetery. To learn about these individuals, see photos of the graves before the most recent damage, and view video clips of the cows damaging the cemetery, please visit this blog: http://pioneercemeterymcdonoughil.blogspot.com/.  

It would be a shame to lose any one of the many, small historical cemeteries of McDonough County, and I sincerely hope some plan can be formulated to preserve this one from further damage. It’s ironic that a small plaque embedded in a gate post at the Pioneer Cemetery reads: "Erected in honor of the pioneers who cleared away the forests and destroyed the abiding places of the wild beasts so that civilization might occupy the ground."

Sincerely,


Carolyn (Venard) Cooper
Chatham, Illinois
The other thing I did today was to call the farmer who owns the cows.  Once again, I got his answering machine.  When I'm up there next week, I'll stop to see him and the cemetery.


.

Friday, June 4, 2010

About this blog and the Pioneer Cemetery


The photos above were taken in November 2007. At that time the cemetery was in poor condition, but still much better than it is today.

Purpose

There are more than 50 individuals interred in the Pioneer Cemetery in McDonough County, Illinois.  Click on a name in the list at right to read biographical data for a person known to be buried here.  Also see the list of "Labels" at lower right to search for surnames of interest that appear in the biographies. 

Only interested in browsing the biographies that include grave photos?  No problem, click here to view the stones of 31 individuals buried here.

In the future, grave and individual photos will be added and biographies updated.  Please feel free to submit comments or queries and be sure to click here to read about how this historic cemetery has fallen into serious neglect and disrepair.

Are You Connected to these Pioneers?

Please feel free to leave your comments on any of the posts here.  Additional photographs and information about your ancestors are also very welcome.

We need interested individuals to help advocate for the rehabilitation of this historic cemetery. 


This is a very weathered stone. This stone has some barely perceptibl inscription that was so worn, it could not be lifted with an aluminum foil method overlay in March 2008.

. . .

Who is Related to Whom in this Cemetery?

These PowerPoint slides show the family connections of the individuals buried in the Pioneer Cemetery.  Light blue rectangles are interred there; purple rectangles are included to clarify key family connections who moved away and are buried elsewhere. 

Evidence of some burials were discovered after I prepared this, so not every individual is included in this slideshow/relationship chart.

Hint:  Click on "menu" in the lower left hand corner and select "full screen" for easier viewing.  When you are finished browsing the slides, hit "escape" to return to this screen.

Sarah (Wilson) Venard

Birth:   1788
            Virginia, USA

Death:  Unknown
            McDonough County, Illinois


A daughter of Tom Wilson of Kentucky, she was the second wife of John Venard who came to Bethel Township, McDonough County, Illinois in 1830, settling on and "fully improving" the southeast quarter of section 14 where he lived until his death. John Venard was a son of William and Dorothy Venard of Harrison county, Kentucky. He brought his wife and children to Illinois in 1829, making a temporary stop in Morgan county before settling in McDonough County.

John and Sarah Venard were the parents of William (born 1816, Harrison Co., Kentucky); Eliza (born 1813); Mary [wife of Henry V. Craig]; Sally Jane (born 1820) [wife of Russell Rigg]; Lucinda [wife of James Hoover].

Sources: "Venard-Van Antwerp-. . . McClure . . . etc. Genealogy," by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1983, Macomb, Illinois, and "Corrections & Additions for Venard-Van Antwerp Genealogy" by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1988; also from a copy of William Venard's will from Harrison County, Kentucky; federal census records; vital statistics; and marriage records from Ancestry.com; the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

The poor condition of this cemetery and the existing stones has made it impossible to locate her grave since prior to 1983 when it was documented by Daniel L. Venard.

. . .

Sarah Jane Venard

Birth:     Feb. 4, 1846
             McDonough County, Illinois

Death:   Jul. 7, 1857
             McDonough County, Illinois


She was the daughter of William and Sarah Jane (McClure) Venard who are buried in this cemetery.

She died at age 11 years, 5 months, 3 days.

The stone was present in November 2007 but in very fragile condition as pictured.  This burial is documented by Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry.

John Venard

Birth:  1781
          Washington County, Pennsylvania

Died: 1849
          McDonough County, Illinois


John Venard was a son of William and Dorothy Venard of Harrison county, Kentucky. Along with his wife and adult children, he made the move to Illinois in 1829 and was temporarily in Morgan County until his land purchase in McDonough County was finalized. His younger brother George Venard (married to Frances Mitchell and buried in Camp Creek Cem., Industry Twp., McDonough Co.), Illinois also came to McDonough County in 1832.

He owned most of the Southeast quarter of section 14, Bethel Township, when he died. The name of his first wife is unknown, his second wife, Sarah (Wilson) is presumed to be the mother of all of his known children.

John and Sarah Venard were the parents of William (born 1816, Harrison Co., Kentucky); Eliza (born 1813); Mary [wife of Henry V. Craig]; Sally Jane (born 1820) [wife of Russell Rigg]; Lucinda [wife of James Hoover].

Sources: "Venard-Van Antwerp-. . . McClure . . . etc. Genealogy," by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1983, Macomb, Illinois, and "Corrections & Additions for Venard-Van Antwerp Genealogy" by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1988; also from a copy of William Venard's will from Harrison County, Kentucky, federal census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com, the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index

The poor condition of this cemetery and the existing stones has made it impossible to locate his grave since prior to 1983 when it was documented by Daniel L. Venard

. . ..

William Venard

Birth:   Jan. 29, 1816
           Harrison County, Kentucky

Death:  Jun. 5, 1881
            McDonough County, Illinois


Above, the William and Sarah Jane Venard stone as it appeared about 1973. Photo by Dan Venard of Macomb (now deceased).

Green vegetation covered the cemetery in the summer of 1994 when the stone was still upright yet tilting.  Fourteen years later in March 2008 (below), the stone was on the ground, embedded in mud with the top of the stone further displaced.

One of the pioneer farmers in McDonough County, William Venard was the only son born to John and Sarah (Wilson) Venard. He moved with his parents, sisters, several uncles, aunts and cousins to Illinois around 1830, settling briefly in Morgan County before moving to Bethel Township in 1831. Upon his father's death, he bought out the interest of the other heirs, ultimately owning 200 acres of fully improved, mostly prairie, nearly all under cultivation in the southeast quarter of section 14. In the 1840's he was part of the McDonough County militia serving in Illinois' "Mormon War."

In 1836 William Venard married another native Kentuckian, Sara Jane McClure, daughter of Greenup & Mary (McComsey) McClure. Theirs was the first wedding in Bethel Township. They were the parents of nine children: Isabel, John F., George Greenup, Sarah Jane, James William, Perry Wilson, Robert Y., Thomas Webster, and Josephine.

He shares a large granite stone with his wife (her inscription is on the opposite side).  The stone has been knocked off its base it is lying sideways in the cemetery.  The grave photos above are among the most striking depictions of the manner in which this cemetery has deteriorated over the past 30 years. It will take a great deal of assistance to replace this very heavy granite stone on its pedestal.

William Venard's parents, several daughters, and his in-laws are also buried in this cemetery.

His obituary appeared in the Macomb Journal on June 9, 1881:
"An early settler of McDonough county, William Venard died at his home in Bethel township on June 5th, 1881. He was born in Harrison county, Kentucky in 1816, came to Morgan county, Illinois in 1821, and then to McDonough county. He was married to Sarah Jane McClure in 1836. He is survived by his wife, 6 sons and 2 daughters. The funeral was Monday, and he was buried in the burial ground near his residence. Attending the funeral of their father and brother-in-law were J.F. Venard and Robert McClure of Carroll county, Missouri and J.W. Venard of Cherokee, Kansas."

Primary sources: "Venard-Van Antwerp-. . . McClure . . . etc. Genealogy," by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1983, Macomb, Illinois, and "Corrections & Additions for Venard-Van Antwerp Genealogy" by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1988.

Additional biographical information comes from historical newspapers, census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com, the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, and from Duane Lester's, "Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry."

. . .

George Brundage

Birth:   Oct. 10, 1837, McDonough County, Illinois

Died:   Oct. 21, 1838, McDonough County, Illinois
 

Infant son of Mary (Alexander) and Soloman Brundage. The baby died at 1 year and 11 days old. Mary Brundage is also interred in this cemetery.  Another young child, also named George Brundage is likewise interred in this cemetery; that child is a half-brother to this infant from his father's second marriage.

Burial is documented by: Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry.  The stone was located lying flat in March 2008.

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

. . .

George R. Brundage

Birth: Aug., 1851, McDonough County, Illinois

Died: Oct. 9, 1851, McDonough County, Illinois




This baby died at 1 month, 17 days old. He was the third child born to Soloman Brundage and his second wife, Catherine Smedley.  Another young child, also named George Brundage is likewise interred in this cemetery; that child is a half-brother to this infant by means of his father's first marriage.

The baby's burial is documented by: Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry. The surface of the stone is faded, but the aluminum foil overlay technique allowed easy identification as evidenced by the photograph from March 2008 which appears above.

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

. . .

Lucy Ann (McClure) Brundage

Birth:  Oct. 14, 1819
          Shelby County, Kentucky

Died:  Nov. 20, 1861
          McDonough County, Illinois


Lucy Brundage's gravestone  (above)  was found lying flat and mostly buried in mud and leaves in March 2008.  Her burial is in the Brundage area of the  cemetery.

Lucy Ann (McClure) Brundage was the daughter of Greenup and Mary (McComsey) McClure.  She died at age 42 years, 1 month, 6 days.  This cemetery is located on the McClure homestead that was purchased by her father, Greenup McClure, when he moved his family to Illinois in the early 1830's.

Lucy married John Brundage (born 1818 in Henderson, Kentucky) in McDonough County, Illinois on June 12, 1839. They were the parents of George, James, Mary Jane, Lorinda, Columbus, Margaret A., William, John, and two who died in infancy.  The infants, Nancy and Sarah Elizabeth Brundage, are also interred in this cemetery.  The son named John appears in the 1860 census at 3 years of age, but I cannot locate him in records after that time. He may also have died at an early age, and if so, it's quite possible that he is buried here.

After her death, Lucy's husband, John Brundage, married Susanna Moore in March of 1863. They had three children together before moving to Missouri. John Brundage died in Central City, Putnam Co., Missouri in 1888.

Burial is documented in this cemetery by this source: Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry.

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

. . .

Mary (Alexander) Brundage

Birth:    Nov. 6, 1800
            Kentucky

Death:  Nov. 13, 1839
            McDonough County, Illinois



She was the first wife of Soloman Brundage. She married him in Kentucky on March 23, 1817. Mary Brundage died at age 39 years, 7 days after giving birth to a healthy, surviving son (Joseph). She was predeceased by an infant son, George, who was buried in this cemetery in 1838. Her other children were: John, Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary Jane, Daniel, Margaret, Nancy, James, and Joseph.

Her husband remarried in 1840, to Catherine Smedley with whom he had four more children. He died in Memphis, Missouri in 1873.  His obituary is as follows and is included here, because he has a wife and two children laid to rest in this cemetery:
Memphis Reveille
Vol. 10 Memphis, MO
Thursday, Feb. 25, 1875
#16, Page 3
DEATH OF AN OLD AND HIGHLY ESTEEMED CITIZEN

Solomon Brundage - Departed this life February 13th, 1875 - age 77 years and 7 days. Father Brundage was born near Winchester, Clark County, Kentucky, Feb. 6, 1798. In the year 1814 and when he was but 16 year old, he served as a private soldier at Buchadad Fort in the state of Indiana, until discharged in consequence of being wounded. After this he married in his native state. In 1826 he removed with his family
to Sagamore County, Illinois. In 1831 he joined the command of Capt. Dawson of this county and fought in the Black Hawk War; served one term; enlisted again and saw many hardships in this campaign, besides being wounded.

When peace was proclaimed he was honorably discharged and returned to his family and farm. In 1836 he removed with his family to McDonough County, Illinois. In 1856 he became a citizen of Scotland County,
Missouri. He was twice married and was the parent of 14 children. He leaves a family consisting of a wife, one widowed daughter, one son and one granddaughter to mourn their irreparable death.

He had a remarkable dream; it was related to your correspondent by the family of deceased that three years ago he had a dream or vision anda voice said, "Are you ready to die?" Answer, "Yes?" voice. Three years shall lapse and you must die. Those words came true with the exception of three days. Father Brundage died as he had lived, without an enemy in the world, and in full faith that his sufferings were forever at an end.

The funeral ceremonies were conducted by Rev. Bartlett Anderson, and although the day was extremely cold and disagreeable, yet his remains were followed to their last resting place by relatives and a large concourse of friends; realizing as they stood there in the cheerless, pitiless and freezing storm of wind that they were consigning to another earth one whose hand had ever been ready to feed the hungry; help the fatherless and the widows and extend charity to all mankind.  Scotland County Missouri Feb. 1875 M.T.H.

Sources:

Burial of Mary (Alexander) Brundage is documented by: Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry.

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, historical newspapers and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

Nancy Brundage

Birth:   Dec. 16, 1856
           Schuyler County, Illinois

Death:  Jan. 23, 1857
            Schuyler County, Illinois

The stone is supposed to have this inscription:  "Daughter of John and Lucy Ann (McClure) Brundage. Age 1 month, 7 days."  The child's mother is also buried in this cemetery which was established on land owned by Greenup McClure, this child's grandfather.  I did not locate a stone in November 2007, likely due to general poor condition of this cemetery and the existing stones.

Burial is documented by: Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry.
Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

. . .

Sarah Elizabeth Brundage

Birth:   Mar. 6, 1861
           McDonough County, Illinois

Died:   Mar. 6, 1861
           McDonough County, Illinois

This infant was the daughter of John and Lucy Ann (McClure) Brundage. Lucy Ann Brundage is interred in this cemetery as well as this child's infant sister, Nancy Brundage. This infant's grandparents owned the land on which the cemetery was established (Greenup McClure's property). Her grandparents and many other relatives are interred here as well.

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

Burial is documented by: Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry. I did not locate a stone in November 2007, likely due to general poor condition of this cemetery and the existing stones.

. . .

Sarah Ann (Husted) Buzzard

Birth:  1828
            Coshocton County, Ohio

Died:  1899
           McDonough County, Illinois


She was the daughter of Caleb and Phebe (Purdy) Husted, and she was the wife of David Buzzard, a farmer, who was born in Pennsylvania about 1817. They were married Feb 26, 1849 in McDonough County. Several of their children were born in Iowa: Franklin about 1858, Timothy about 1860, Elvira in 1862, and Daniel in1865. Their youngest child, Peter, was born in Illinois in 1867.

The World Family Tree database on Ancestry.com shows two additional children for this couple, Clarinda (born 1850) and Simon (born 1856) both born in McDonough County, IL, but they do not appear on any census records for the family.

Sarah's brothers Talmon and Amos are also buried in this cemetery in graves close to her own.  Her parents died in McDonough County and are possibly also interred in this cemetery.

The photo of her tombstone was taken in March 2008.  As of May 2010, this stone has been toppled forward by the cows roaming through the cemtery. 

. . .


. . .

Samuel Calvin (County Commissioner)

Birth:    Feb., 1800
             Mason, Kentucky

Died:    Apr. 23, 1866
            McDonough County, Illinois



Samuel Calvin was first married to Pheobe Currey (1801-1841).  They married September 22, 1821 in Brown County, Ohio.  Phoebe Currey Calvin is possibly also interred in this cemetery.  Together they had at least six children:  Robert Curry, John, William Harvey, Indiana, George Bailey, and Mary L. He married Mary Haney (or Hainey) in January 1842 in Schuyler County, Illinois. They had at least two children, Harry C. and Margaret Ann.

Samuel Calvin was politically active in McDonough County.  He was a Democratic candidate, successfully elected as a McDonough County Commissioner in 1848, and in 1853 he was elected as an Associate Justice.  He served as a private in the McDonough County militia that was raised for the so-called "Mormon War" of 1844.

The 1850 federal census shows Samuel Calvin, farmer, living in Bethel Township, McDonough County, Illinois with his wife Mary, who was born in Pennsylvania about 1811. Two sons listed in the household, "Harvey" (22), and George (19) and his daughters Indiana (24) and Mary (16) were also born in Ohio. Two more children, Harry (7 yrs) and Margaret A. (6 months) were born in Illinois.
Duane Lester's, "Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry," biographical notes document that Samuel Calvin served from McDonough County during the "Mormon War" in the 1840's, and he was also a McDonough County commissioner during that era.  Other biographical information compiled from census records, vital statistics,  and S. J. Clarke's 1878 History of McDonough County.

. . .

Sarah A. (Raymond) (Smith) Downey

Birth:  1854
            New York

Died:   Sep. 17, 1883
            McDonough County, Illinois



Inscription: "Wife of John and dau. of G.F. & S.A. Raymond"

She died at age 29 years, 5 months, 4 days.

She was the daughter of Gabriel F. and Sarah Ann Raymond who are also interred in this cemetery. She was born in New York state, the eldest of five children. The family moved to Illinois in 1858 and arrived in McDonough County in 1869. When she married John S. Downey on January 3, 1880, her name was "Mrs. Sarah Smith."

The 1880 census shows that John S. Downey was a 19-year-old farmer, head of the house, while she was 26 years old and keeping house. Her two children from her previous marriage are shown living in the household of her parents nearby. Daughter Bertha A. Smith was 5 years old; her son, Daniel G. Smith was 3 years old. Both children were born in Illinois.

After her death, Sarah's widower married Finetta Stoneking in 1884. They had at least six children together and eventually moved to Canton, Illinois where he died in 1941.
Burial is documented by: Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry. The stone is weathered and difficult to read, but overlaying aluminum foil on the face of the stone and gently smoothing over the letters allowed a perfect reading of the inscription.

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

. . .

James E. Frisbie

Birth:  Jul., 1872
           McDonough County, Illinois

Died:  Jan. 2, 1873
          McDonough County, Illinois



Inscription: "Son of W. & M., age 5 m 5 d"

This infant was the son of William and Margaret (Griffin) Frisbie who were married 9/9/1869 in McDonough County. Siblings of this child were Philemon (1871), William (1875), Joseph (1877), and Robert (1879).

This infant's father, William Frisbie, was born in Virginia about 1836; his mother was born about 1848 in Illinois.

As pictured in March of 2008, the stone is broken and lying flat. This burial is also documented in Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry.  Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

. . .

Elizabeth (Matthews) Fugate

Birth:    Dec. 21, 1825
            Cass County, Illinois

Death:   Mar. 29, 1906
             McDonough County, Illinois



Elizabeth E. Matthews was born in Cass County, Illinois. She was the daughter of Benjamin and Mary "Polly" (Shoopman) Matthews who were both born in Virginia and died in McDonough County, Illinois.

She married Isaac Quincy Fugate, January 10, 1849 in McDonough County, Illinois. They owned a farm on section 21 in Bethel Township, McDonough County, Illinois. They were the parents of George (Nov. 4, 1850); Nancy Caroline (b. April 1852) [m. John Haney]; Mary Catherine "Kate" (b. Oct 1855) [m. John Raymond Gunning]; Martha J. (b. 1857) [m. Samuel Bowman]; Benjamin Martin (1860), Sarah Eleanor "Ella" (Oct. 1863) [she is interred in this cemetery], and Edward (1865).

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com, the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, and from Duane Lester's, "Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry."

. . .

Isaac Quincy Fugate

Birth: Apr. 4, 1820
           Russell County, Virginia

Died: Sep. 20, 1895
          McDonough County, Illinois



Isaac Fugate was born in Russell County, Virginia, a son of Martin and Nancy B. (Hobbs) Fugate.

Isaac Fugate married Elizabeth Matthews, January 10, 1849 in McDonough County, Illinois. They owned a farm on section 21 in Bethel Township, McDonough County, Illinois. He served in the 1840's "Mormon War" as a soldier from McDonough County.

Isaac and Elizabeth Fugate were the parents of George (Nov. 4, 1850); Nancy Caroline (b. April 1852) [m. John Haney]; Mary Catherine "Kate" (b. Oct 1855)[m. John Raymond Gunning]; Martha J.(b. 1857) [m. Samuel Bowman]; Benjamin Martin (1860), Sarah Eleanor "Ella" (Oct. 1863) [she is interred in this cemetery], and Edward (1865).

Isaac Fugate's parents were natives of Virginia who moved their family to Monroe county, Indiana in about 1830. In 1832 they moved to McDonough County, Illinois where they purchased 160 acres of land on section 30 in Bethel Township. His brother John W. Fugate was also a well-known farmer in Bethel Township.

Biographical information is summarized from: History of McDonough County, Illinois, 1885, Continental Historical Co., Springfield, Illinois. Transcribed by Karl A. Petersen for McDonough County ILGenWeb.

Additional biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com, the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, and from Duane Lester's, "Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry."

. . .

Sarah Eleanor "Ella" Fugate

Birth:   Oct. 2, 1863
             McDonough County, Illinois

Died Aug. 26, 1885
            McDonough County, Illinois


*"Daughter of I.Q. & E.E. Fugate"


Ella Fugate was a daughter of Isaac Q. and Elizabeth E. (Matthews) Fugate who owned a farm on section 21 in Bethel Township, McDonough County, Illinois. (Please see their bios on this site and photo of the stone they share). Ella's siblings were: George (Nov. 4, 1850); Nancy Caroline (b. April 1852) [m. John Haney]; Mary Catherine "Kate" (b. Oct 1855) [m. John Raymond Gunning]; Martha J.(b. 1857) [m. Samuel Bowman]; Benjamin Martin (1860), and Edward (1865).

This burial is documented by: Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry.

*The stone is photographed as it appeared in March 2008.  Due to the weathered condition of the stone, aluminum foil overlay was gently applied and rubbed to obtain a relief image of the inscription.

Biographical information also comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.


. . .

Mary Ann (Wilson) Gibson

Birth:    Feb. 1, 1830
             Champaign County, Ohio

Died:     Jul. 29, 1867
             McDonough County, Illinois


Mary Ann (Wilson) Gibson was the wife of Isaac W. Gibson, a farmer in Bethel Township, McDonough County, Illinois.  They were married on July 1, 1858.  She was born Feb 1, 1830, in Champaign Co., Ohio, a daughter of John and Jane (McComsey) Wilson. Her parents and a brother, Eli Wilson, is buried in this cemetery along with several of her cousins, an aunt, nieces and nephews.

Census records do not reveal evidence of any living children born to Mary Ann and J.W. Gibson. However, the mortality index for Bethel Township in 1860 does show that a one-month-old male, William Gibson, died in November 1859.  In the 1860 census enumeration Mary Ann Gibson's mother, Jane Wilson, and sister, Malissa Chenney, were living with her and her husband. The 1870 census shows that her husband still farming in McDonough County with his late wife's sister, Malissa Chenney, living as a domestic in his home. 

The stone, photographed in March 2008, was found lying flat on the ground.  If the infant mentioned in the 1860 mortality index was indeed her son, it is likely that he is also interred in this cemetery.

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com, the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, and from Duane Lester's, "Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry."

. . .

Jesse F. Hite

Birth   Nov., 1868
             McDonough County, Ilinois

Died:     Jul. 20, 1870
             McDonough County, Ilinois



This infant was born in McDonough County, Ilinois. He was the child of John S. and Rebecca (Stoneking) Hite, who were married in McDonough County on September 7, 1867. The baby appears in the 1870 census at age 1, the only child in the household at that time. At that time they resided in Industry where the 24-year-old father, originally from Indiana, worked as a laborer.  The mother was 23 years old, born in Virginia.

By June of 1880, John and Rebecca Hite were living in Crawford County, Kansas with two children:  George M., age 8, (born in Illinois) and daughter, Laura, 3 months old, born in Kansas in March 1880. John Hite's father (Alexander) and several of his siblings occupied the adjacent property in Kansas. All were engaged in farming.

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

Burial is documented by: Duane Lester's, "Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry.

The tombstone was photographed in March 2008, broken and laying on its back.

. . .

Amos Husted

Birth:   1831
            Coshocton County, Ohio

Died:    Mar. 14, 1866
            McDonough County, Illinois

Inscription: "34 y, 4m, 19d"

Amos Husted was born in Coshocton, Ohio, the third child of Caleb and Phebe (Purdy) Husted. His entire family relocated to McDonough County, Illinois sometime after 1848.  He married "Mrs. Jane Driskell" in McDonough County, Illinois on December 18, 1856. There are no documented children for this couple. After his death, his widow married for the third time (to John Allison) in 1875.

Amos Husted's sister, Sarah (Husted) Buzzard, and his older brother, Talmon Husted, are also interred in this cemetery. His parents and his wife may also be buried here.

Burial is documented by: Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry.

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

 . ..

Talmon Husted (Civil War Vet)

Birth:   1825
            Coshocton County, Ohio

Died:    Dec. 9, 1875
            McDonough County, Illinois

*Inscription: "Co A., 78th Ill Infantry"

Talmon Husted was born in Coshocton, Ohio, the eldest child of Caleb and Phebe (Purdy) Husted. His entire family relocated to McDonough County, Illinois after 1848.  He married Martha V. (Pendams) in Schuyler County, Illinois on February 4, 1856.  She died in 1870.

He served in Company A, 78th Illinois Infantry in the Civil War enlisting as a private on August 11, 1862. He fought in major battles incluidng Chickamauga, GA and Missionary Ridge, TN, before mustering out on March 24, 1864. 

He married his second wife, Lucinda N. Davis, on August 23, 1874 in McDonough County.

His sister, Sarah (Husted) Buzzard, and his brother, Amos Husted, are also interred in this cemetery. His parents and his first wife may also be buried here.

Burial is documented by: Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry.
*The aluminum foil overlay/rubbing method was used to clearly distinguish the inscription on the phone for easy reading and to enhance photography.

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

. . .

John Wilson, Sr.

Birth Aug. 12, 1781
            Greenbriar County, Virginia, USA

Died Jun. 14, 1843
            McDonough County, Illinois, USA




John Wilson, a native of Virginia, married Jane McComsey on December 20, 1809 in Madison, Ohio. They were the parents of eight known children, all born in Ohio:   Jane; Malinda (died as infant); Malissa (wife of Wm. Cheney); Margaret (wife of Carroll Lane); Samuel (husband of Susan Edmonston); John Jr. (husband of Isabell Venard); Eli Wilson (spouse of Sophia Beck) and Mary Ann (spouse of J.W. Gibson).

John Wilson's wife Jane and two of his children, Eli Wilson and Mary Ann Gibson, are also buried in this cemetery.

John Wilson purchased the east half of the northwest quadrant of Section 22 in Bethel Township, McDonough County, Illinois in January of 1835. His wife's sister and brother-in-law, Greenup and Mary "Polly" McClure, purchased the west half of this same quadrant in September 1835.  The Pioneer Cemetery lies within the McClure half of Section 22.  Robert McComsey purchased the Southwest quadrant of Section 21 in Bethel Township in August of 1836, and he is believed to be the brother-in-law of John Wilson.

This burial is documented in Lester's "Rural Cemeteries" (see reference below), and the stone was photographed in the spring of 2008.

His burial is the third oldest recorded for this cemetery.  The stone was weathered and lying flat, but legible as of March 2008. His burial is the third oldest recorded for this cemetery.

**Biographical information comes from family records, census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, Illinois Public Land Purchase Index, and from Duane Lester's, "Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry."

**Special thanks to Goldie (Wilson) Vining of Washington state--John's great-great-grandaughter and my third cousin (three times removed).

. . .

Jane (McComsey) Wilson

Birth:   Oct. 7, 1787
             Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky

Died:    Feb. 11, 1861
             McDonough County, Illinois

Jane (McComsey) Wilson was born in Kentucky, a daughter of John McComsey.  She married John Wilson on December 20, 1809 in Madison, Ohio.  She was the mother of Eli Wilson and Mary Ann (Wilson) Gibson who are also buried in this cemetery. They were the parents of eight known children, all born in Ohio: Jane; Malinda (died as infant); Malissa (wife of Wm. Cheney); Margaret (wife of Carroll Lane); Samuel (husband of Susan Edmonston); John Jr. (husband of Isabell Venard); Eli Wilson (spouse of Sophia Beck) and Mary Ann (spouse of J.W. Gibson).

Jane Wilson's husband purchased the east half of the Northwest fourth of Section 22 in Bethel Township, McDonough County, Illinois in January of 1835. Jane's sister and brother-in-law, Mary "Polly" and Greenup McClure, purchased the west half of this same quadrant in Sep 1835. . Robert McComsey who purchased the southwest quadrant of Section 21 in Bethel Township in August of 1836 is possibly Jane's brother or cousin.

Jane Wilson's burial in this cemetery is documented by family tradition. Her children's and husband's stones are in place but in delicate to deteriorating condtions.

**Biographical information comes from family records, census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, Illinois Public Land Purchase Index, and from Duane Lester's, "Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry."

**Special thanks to Goldie (Wilson) Vining of Washington state--Jane's great-great-grandaughter and my third cousin (three times removed).


. . .

Elizabeth Wilson

Birth:  1853

Died:   1865, McDonough County, Illinois




Elizabeth Wilson was the daughter of Eli Wilson and Sarah (Beck) Wilson. Her parents were early settlers in Bethel Township in McDonough County Illinois. She she shares this tombstone with her father and her brother, Edward.


. . .

Eli Wilson

Birth:    Sep. 27, 1824
             Mechanicsburg (Champaign County), Ohio

Died:    1867
             McDonough County, Illinois

Eli Wilson was a son of John Wilson and Jane McCompsey. He was born in Mechanicsburg, Champaign County, Ohio in 1824. On Sep 25, 1851 he married Sophia E. Beck in McDonough County, Illinois. She was born in Greencastle, Indiana in 1830, a daughter of James and Elizabeth Beck (both born in North Carolina). Sophia died in 1917 in Kirkman, Iowa where she is buried in Rosehill/Kirkman cemetery.

Eli Wilson shares his tombstone with two of his children: Edward B., 1852-1854 and Elizabeth, 1853-1865.

Other known children born to Eli and Sophia Wilson:  Jacob born 1849-1934 in McDonough Co.; Jane, born 1854, per the 1860 census; Oliver Browning "Brum" Wilson 1855-1942 (died in Shelby Co., Iowa); Mary Bell born 1857; Anna Catherine 1859-1916 (married to Elijah Flack—and is buried in Industry, IL); Melissa born 1860; Alice born 1864; and Eli born 1867.

Eli Wilson's parents and a sister, Mary Ann (Wilson) Gibson, are also buried in this cemetery. His aunt, Mary "Polly" (McCompsey) McClure, and cousin Sarah Jane (McClure) Venard are likewise interred here.

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index and from Duane Lester's, "Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry."

Check out the video clip taken on Memorial Day weekend in May 2010 to see the current condition of this stone.  It's the fourth clip in this blog post, the one with the green border. The stone is now toppled from its base because of damage by cows inhabiting the cemetery.


. . .

Edward B. Wilson

Birth:   1852
             McDonough County, Illinois

Died:    1854
             McDonough County, Illinois




Edward B. Wilson was the son of Eli Wilson and Sarah (Beck) Wilson.  His parents were early settlers in Bethel Township in McDonough County Illinois.  He shares this tombstone with his father and sister Elizabeth.


. . .

Hannah (Wilson) Whitson

Birth:   1823
            Illinois

Died:    Mar. 11, 1851
            Either Schuyler or McDonough County, Illinois

According to Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry, the stone reads that she was the "wife of B. F." and she died at age 28. I was not able to locate this stone in November of 2007 nor March 2008.

There are a number of Wilson family connections in this cemetery, but no established link between this Hannah (Wilson) Whitson and any of them. However, there are any number of cemeteries nearer to Rushville in neighboring Schuyler County where she could have been interred. Because she is not buried closer to the place she resided with her husband, it is reasonable to suspect a connection with the Wilsons interred here.

Hannah Willson [sic] and Benjamin F. Whitson were married in Schuyler County, Illinois, on January 11, 1848. He was born in Pennsylvania around 1824.  He was a 26-year-old constable in the 1850 census, residing with his wife Hannah (then age 24), their one-year-old son Burt and an un-named 3-month-old daughter (who is also interred in this cemetery). The family resided in Rushville, in Schuyler County, which borders McDonough County, and Hannah may have died in Schuyler County.

Hannah Whitson's husband Benjamin was from a well-to-do family.  His father owned a great deal of land and was engaged in agricultural pursuits related to apple-orcharding. Benjamin's brother, George T. Whitson, was the sheriff in Schulyer Co. in 1872, but he also was engaged in the plastering trade and he would occasionally venture to the west coast to pan for gold. Another brother, Wilbur, gained wealth in Schuyler County from his excellent livestock: Jersey cattle and Poland-China hogs.

After the death of Hannah, Benjamin Whitson married Mary Ellen Goldsbury (or Gooldsbury) on October 5, 1854. She was born in Ohio. It is likely that she was a widow. She had a 10-year-old son and other younger children already in the 1860 census. All of her children including the 10-year-old, Bradley, used the Whitson surname. In the 1870 census this couple lived in Macomb with their many children. Son Burt at age 21 was still in the household and working with his father, both as plasterers. However, Benjamin Whitson was absent from the household in 1860 and 1880. It is clear that Burt the head of household in 1880, still unmarried, living at home and providing an income working as a laborer with only his step-mother and some of his younger step-siblings in the home. It's unclear what became of Benjamin Whitson, but some historical records indicate he may have moved to Will County where his father had established another farm . . . or perhaps he was absent with his brother panning for gold on the Pacific Coast.

Biographical information comes from census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

. ..

Baby Girl Whitson

Birth:   1850
             Schuyler County, Illinois

Died:     December 1850
             Probably either McDonough or Schuyler County, Illinois

The stone was originally inscribed, “Infant of B.F. and D [sic], age 5 m, 14d”, according to Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry. The tombstone could not be located in November 2007 or March 2008.

The "D" (referenced above) must be a typographical error in the Lester publication or was misread at transcriptoin for the letter "H."  This baby girl is the daughter of Benjamin F. and Hannah (Wilson) Whitson. Hannah Whitson is also interred in this cemetery. This baby was three months old when census takers visited the family home in 1850; her older brother Burt was age one.  There are no other known children born to this couple.

Biographical information comes from careful perusal of census records, county history abstracts, records of vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.


. . .

William Cheney

Birth:    Unknown

Died    Oct. 22, 1851
             McDonough County, Illinois




William Cheney's stone was discovered buried in mud in March 2008. It is not documented in Duane Lester's, "Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry." The age of the deceased was not discerned due to the deteriorated condition of the stone which is pictured above as it was found, partially buried and laying flat.

William Cheney married Malissa Wilson, daughter of John and Jane Wilson who are buried in this cemetery, on Nov. 29, 1832 (source pending verification: http://www.geocities.com/mccumsey).

Illinois land purchase records show that a William Cheney purchased two parcels of land in McDonough County in 1837. Both parcels lying in Township 05N (not Bethel Township).

S.J. Clarke's published history of McDonough County published in 1878 index lists a William Cheney on page 403. He was an unsuccessful 1850 Whig party candidate for county treasurer.

A search of relevant census records reveals that Malissa Wilson Cheney did not remarry.  She lived with her sister and brother-in-law, Mary Ann and  J.W. Gibson.  Malissa continued as a housekeeper in her brother-in-law's residence after her sister's death and until at least 1870.  By 1880 she and her sister, Margaret Lane, both resided with Margaret's son, Samuel, and his family in Tennessee Township in McDonough Co., Illinois.

. . .

Lorren (McClure) Thompson

Birth:    1825
             Shelby County, Kentucky

Died:     March 16, 1893
             McDonough County, Illinois


The wonderful photo of Lorren, circa 1880, was shared by the late Daniel Lloyd Venard.

Inscription:  “Wife of Wm., age 69y"

Daniel Lloyd Venard's research indicates that Lorren (spelling varies) was born in Shelby County, Kentucky. She married William Thompson on March 2, 1848 in McDonough County, Illinois.

William and Lorren Thompson were the parents of 11 children, and (highlighted in green) at least four of them are also buried in this cemetery:  Mary E. [Keersucker] (born 1849); John Thomas (1851-1871); Joann (1853-1869); Charles (born and died 1859); George (1854); Samuel G. (1856); Rozella (1860); Sarah (1861-1878); Franklin L. (1865); Alice (1866)' and William (1871).

Most census records found William and Lorren McClure residing in Bethel Township; however, in 1870 the family was living in the 4th Ward in the city of Macomb, McDonough County.

This biographical note is quoted from, "History of McDonough County, Illinois, 1885," Continental Historical Co., Springfield, Illinois:
"Mrs. Lorrin Thompson was born at Shelbyville, Kentucky, in 1825. Her parents were Greenup and Mary (Macumpsey) McClure, who moved from Kentucky, to this county, and here died. Her husband died in January, 1872. Mrs. Thompson has a farm in Bethel township, consisting of 160 acres, 40 acres of it timber, the balance under a good state of cultivation, and well improved, on section 10. She is the mother of 11 children, four of whom are deceased."
She was a member of the M.E. Church.

The tombstone is shared by Lorren and William Thompson and four of their children.  Inscriptions for the various family member can be found on each of the four sides of the stone.

This burial is documented by: Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry.

Other sources: Venard-Van Antwerp . . . McClure . . . etc. Genealogy, by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1983, Macomb, Illinois, and Corrections & Additions for Venard-Van Antwerp Genealogy, by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1988; federal census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com, and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.



. . .

William Thompson

Birth:     1823
               Kentucky or Indiana

Died:      Jan. 27, 1873
              McDonough County, Illinois




William Thompson shares this stone with his wife Lorren and four of their children. Inscriptions documenting their burials can be found on each side of the stone.

William Thompson was a farmer in McDonough County, Illinois.  He married Lorren McClure on March 2, 1848 in McDonough County. Census records in 1860 and 1870 list his place of birth as Kentucky. In 1880 census his children list their father's birthplace as Indiana.

This biographical note for his wife Lorren from the History of McDonough County, Illinois, 1885, Continental Historical Co., Springfield, Illinois states that the Thompson farm in Bethel township, consisted of "160 acres, 40 acres of it timber, the balance under a good state of cultivation, and well improved, on section 10."

William and Lorren Thompson were the parents of 11 children, at least four of whom (highlighted in green) are also buried in this cemetery: Mary E. [Keersucker] (1849), John "Thomas" (1851-1871), Joann (1853-1869), Charles (born & died 1859), George (1854), Samuel G. (1856), Rozella (1860), Sarah J. (1861-1878), Franklin L. (1865), Alice (1866), and William (1871).

The Thompsons attended the M. E. church. Most census records found them living in Bethel Township; however, in 1870 the family was living in Ward 4 in the city of Macomb in McDonough County.

This burial is documented by: Duane Lester's, Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry.

Other sources: Venard-Van Antwerp-. . . McClure . . . etc. Genealogy, by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1983, Macomb, Illinois, and Corrections & Additions for Venard-Van Antwerp Genealogy, by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1988; federal m census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com, and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

. ..

Sarah Thompson

Birth:   1861
             Illinois

Died:    November 12, 1878
             McDonough County, Illinois


Her brother John Thomas Thompson's name also appears on this side of the family stone.

Sarah Thompson was a daughter of William and Lorren (McClure) Thompson. She died at 17 years of age . She was a grandaughter of Greenup and Polly (McComsey) McClure, the original owners of the land upon which the cemetery was established.  She shares this tombstone with her parents and several siblings.

This burial is documented by: Duane Lester's, "Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry."

Other sources: "Venard-Van Antwerp . . . McClure . . . etc. Genealogy," by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1983, Macomb, Illinois, and "Corrections & Additions for Venard-Van Antwerp Genealogy" by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1988; federal census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com, and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

. . .

John "Thomas" Thompson

Birth:    1851
             Illinois

Died:     March 14, 1871
             McDonough County, Illinois



John "Thomas" Thompson was a son of William Thompson and Lorren (McClure) Thompson and a grandson of Greenup and Polly (McComsey) McClure. He appears in the June 1870 census at age 17, living with his parents and some of his siblings in the 4th Ward of Macomb, McDonough County. The census indicates that he had attended school during the previous 12 months.  He shares this stone with his parents and several siblings.

This burial is documented by: Duane Lester's Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois, Volume II, Bethel-Industry."

Other sources: Venard-Van Antwerp-. . . McClure . . . etc. Genealogy, by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1983, Macomb, Illinois, and Corrections & Additions for Venard-Van Antwerp Genealogy by Daniel Lloyd Venard, 1988; federal census records, vital statistics, and marriage records from Ancestry.com, and the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index.

. . .